The President's Approval Rating After 11 Months In Office


 
Disapproval percentage of the president's performance has— for the first time— exceeded the approval rating by about 10 percentage points, with more than half of all Egyptians in favor of early presidential elections.

Disapproval percentage of the president's performance has— for the first time— exceeded the approval rating by about 10 percentage points, with more than half of all Egyptians in favor of early presidential elections.


The Egyptian center for public opinion research "Baseera" has conducted its periodical opinion poll measuring the approval rating of presidential performance after 11 months in office, with results indicating a decline in the percentage of respondents who approve the president’s performance to 42% compared to 46% after 10 months in office and 78% at the end of the first 100 days of President Mohammed Morsi's tenure.


While opinion polls conducted over the last few months have revealed a general trend of decline in the president's approval rating, poll results of the eleventh month have— for the first time— revealed an increase in the percentage of respondents who do not approve the president's performance over the percentage of those who do, by about 10 percentage points, with disapproval reaching 52%.


In urban governorates, president's approval rating has decreased to 30%, compared to approximately 34% after ten months in office. Upper Egypt has witnessed a clear decline in approval rating, falling to 51%, compared to 58% after ten months, while approval in Lower Egypt reached 41%—the same percentage measured after ten months.


Level of education plays a clear role in citizens' evaluation of the president's performance, with approval rating falling to 35% among those with university or higher education, compared to approximately 46% among those with a less than intermediate education.


Respondents were addressed a question: "If elections were held tomorrow with Mohammed Morsy as a candidate, would you elect him?” Results indicated that only 30% intend to elect him—the same percentage measured after ten months. In contrast, the percentage of those who do not intend to re-elect him climbed to 50%, compared to approximately 45% after ten months in office.


Respondents were also asked if they support early presidential elections, with 54% of respondents answering affirmatively. This percentage rises to 62% in urban governorates, compared to 55% in Lower Egypt and 46% in Upper Egypt.


Results also indicate that the youth are more supportive of early elections than other age groups, reaching 60% among those aged 18-29, compared to 54% among those aged 30-49 and 48% among those exceeding 50 years of age.


Higher economic levels are linked to a greater approval of holding early elections, with the percentage of those in favor measuring 50% among Egyptians in the lowest economic level compared to 65% among Egyptians in the highest economic level.


Poll Methodology:


The survey was conducted using landline and mobile telephones, with a sample size of 2,051 respondents ages 18 or older nationwide. All interviews were conducted on Wednesday and Thursday, 29 and 30 May 2013. The response rate was approximately 75%, and the margin of error was less than 3%. Income brackets were determined based on ownership of durable goods. For more information on the detailed findings and the methodology adopted, or to see the graphic presentation of results, please consult our website: www.baseera.com.eg


To download the Press Release

The President's Approval Rating After 11 Months In Office

Disapproval percentage of the president's performance has— for the first time— exceeded the approval rating by about 10 percentage points, with more than half of all Egyptians in favor of early pre

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Baseera is an independent, and nonpartisan private entity for evidence-based public opinion research, and it is committed to providing researchers, policy makers, business leaders, and the general public with reliable information on public attitudes and trends concerning influential policy matters.

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